Management > Security

BCS: Whitehall should plan for a successful digital future outside the EU

David Bicknell Published 22 February 2017

Chartered Institute for IT calls for UK to be an exemplar and innovator for a data age, ensuring information protection equivalence with EU regulations as a minimum goal

 

BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, has called on the government to take advantage of Brexit to become a leader in digital and data.

In a new report , “Digital Brexit: Planning for a successful digital future outside of the EU”, the organisation concludes that the UK’s future success outside the EU will be underpinned by its choices on major digital issues.

It argues that the UK needs to make the right choices for a future that is:

• Data-driven. The BCS says, “we  want  to  see  the  UK  as  an  exemplar  and  innovator  in  a  data  age,  with  data  protection  equivalence with EU regulations as a minimum goal.”

• Digitally-capable. It suggests, “We want to see investment in our current and future workforce along with academia and research to match our ambitions. We also want to create a welcoming environment for the top global talent in our sector.”

• Secure. “We want to see cross-border cooperation on cyber security, together with a boost in UK participation in international standards development to ensure maximised UK capabilities and an integrated security strategy.”

• Connected. It concludes,” We  want  to  see  a  world-leading  digital  infrastructure  that  matches  our  ambitions  in  every sector through strategic cooperation on communications, regulation and pricing beyond Brexit.”

The report said, “Since the June 2016 Referendum result in favour of leaving the European Union, BCS members have been in dialogue about the issues and opportunities that arise from the change in relationship between the UK and Europe. Much uncertainty remains, but there are a number of clear objectives for UK government, business, the IT profession  and  wider  society  to  aim  for.  Most  of  the  issues  are  not  new,  but  are  heightened,  more  urgent or modified as a result of this decision.

“BCS believe the UK now has a choice; it could do what’s necessary to maintain the existing status quo or it could seize this as an opportunity to make the much needed changes in the IT sector that would truly lead to the UK positioning itself as a digital world leader. This report outlines those opportunities available to the UK in this new Brexit context, underpinned by what should happen regardless within the IT sector that will ensure IT is good for society.”

In particular, on data, the BCS said it wants to see:

•   The UK becoming a leader and innovator in data protection. This sets data protection equivalence with EU regulations for the UK to be a minimum goal and high priority in Brexit negotiations.

•   The UK and our members moving beyond a data protection compliance mindset to seeing personal data relationships as a strategic opportunity.

•    The  UK  investing  in  data  frameworks  that  align  social  and  commercial  goals  in  order  to  become  that  innovator  in  data  protection.  A  Royal  Commission  on  personal  data  ecosystems,  how  organisations,  governments and individuals interact, would signal a major improvement in the UK’s ambition as a leader in global data protection and exploitation.

David Evans, director of policy at BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT said: “Since the June 2016 Referendum result in favour of leaving the European Union, BCS members have been in dialogue about the issues and opportunities that arise from the change in relationship between the UK and Europe. Much uncertainty remains, but there are a number of clear objectives for UK government, business, the IT profession and wider society to aim for. Most of the issues are not new, but are heightened, more urgent or modified as a result of this decision.”

Related articles:

Manzoni outlines public trust challenge behind Whitehall data aims

Privacy groups urge dropping entire Digital Economy Bill data clause








We have updated our privacy policy. In the latest update it explains what cookies are and how we use them on our site. To learn more about cookies and their benefits, please view our privacy policy. Please be aware that parts of this site will not function correctly if you disable cookies. By continuing to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with our privacy policy unless you have disabled them.